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Ian Berle: Face Recognition Technology book launch

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Ian Berle: Face Recognition Technology book launch

Date:
Thursday 30 April 2020
Time:
6.00pm - 7.30pm
Venue:
Billiard Room D121, St Mary's University, Twickenham, London

Book your place now

Face Recognition Technology book
Image: Face Recognition Technology book

Please note: This event has been postponed. Please check back later for further information.

Speakers include Professors Geoff Hunt (former CBET Director) and Merris Amos (Professor of Human Rights Law, QMUL) along with Dr Trevor Stammers in conjunction with Centre for Bioethics and Emerging Technologies at St Mary’s University.

The book examines how face recognition technology is affecting privacy and confidentiality in an era of enhanced surveillance. Further, it offers a new approach to the complex issues of privacy and confidentiality, by drawing on Joseph K in Kafka’s disturbing novel The Trial, and on Isaiah Berlin’s notion of liberty and freedom.

Taking into consideration rights and wrongs, protection from harm associated with compulsory visibility, and the need for effective data protection law, the author Ian Berle promotes ethical practices by reinterpreting privacy as a property right. To protect this right, he advocates the licensing of personal identifiable images where appropriate.

The book reviews American, UK and European case law concerning privacy and confidentiality, the effect each case has had on the developing jurisprudence and the ethical issues involved. As such, it offers a valuable resource for students of ethico-legal fields, professionals specialising in image rights law, policy makers and liberty advocates and activists.

Book your place now

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Date:
Thursday 30 April 2020
Time:
6.00pm - 7.30pm
Venue:
Billiard Room D121, St Mary's University, Twickenham, London


Book your place now

Find out more

For more information about this event please email trevor.stammers@stmarys.ac.uk.

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