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Chris Pocock

PhD Student

About Research

Chris graduated from the University of Portsmouth with a First Class BSc (Hons) degree in Sport and Exercise Science. Following his undergraduate degree, Chris completed an MRes at the University of Portsmouth, graduating with a Distinction.

His MRes project focused on the use of an imagery intervention to train visual exploratory activity in elite academy football players. Following the completion of his MRes, Chris joined St Mary's University as a Graduate Teaching Assistant in September 2015 and commenced his full-time PhD studentship in February 2016.


Research

The focus of Chris' PhD is analysing the role of affective and contextual constraints on place kicking performance in Rugby Union. Other current research interests include perception and action coupling and representative learning design.

Chris is part of the special interest research group in Expert Performance and Skill Acquisition (EPSA) at St Mary's. He also contributes to teaching within Skill Acquisition and Biomechanics at St Mary's and has completed the Post Graduate Certificate in Higher Education to become a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Publications

  • Pocock, C., Bezodis, N. E., Davids, K., & North, J. S. (2018). Hot hands, cold feet? Investigating effects of interacting constraints on place kicking performance at the 2015 Rugby Union World Cup. European Journal of Sport Science, In Press. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2018.1486459
  • Pocock, C., Dicks, M., Thelwell, R. C., Chapman, M., & Barker, J. B. (2017). Using an imagery intervention to train Visual Exploratory Activity in elite academy football players. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, In Press.
  • Pocock, C., Bezodis, N. E., Davids, K., & North, J. S. (2017). Effects of task and contextual constraints on place kicking performance at the 2015 Rugby World Cup. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 39 (supplement), S175.
  • Dicks, M., Pocock, C., Thelwell, R., & van der Kamp, J. (2017). A novel on-field training intervention improves novice goalkeeper penalty kick performance. The Sport Psychologist, 31(2), 129-133.