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Dawn Querstret

Programme Director - Psychology of Mental Health

Email: dawn.querstret@stmarys.ac.uk
Tel: 020 8240 4161

About Research

Biography

Dawn completed a BSc Psychology (Hons) at the University of London, and an MSc Health Psychology and PhD Psychology at the University of Surrey. Dawn’s PhD thesis was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and examined the relationship between work-related rumination (perseverative thinking about work in non-work time), sleep and fatigue.

Alongside her PhD, Dawn completed her training in Health Psychology and is registered as a practitioner Health Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council. Dawn is a chartered Health Psychologist with the BPS and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Academic responsibilities

  • Programme Director, MSc Psychology of Mental Health

Modules taught

  • Foundations of Mental Health (PMH7012)
  • Counselling Skills in Psychological Practice
  • The Lived Experience of Mental Health
  • Independent Research Project

Research

Dawn’s research is interdisciplinary straddling occupational, clinical and health psychology. Her primary area of research focuses on understanding impacts to human health and wellbeing in applied (organisational; private- and public-sector) settings, and in developing and evaluating interventions to improve mental health and wellbeing.

Dawn’s work is multi-level considering not only person-level factors, but also wider contextual factors (eg, team-based dynamics, organisational work practices, social environment). Through experimental studies, she has sought not only to understand whether an intervention is effective, but also to understand the mechanisms by which interventions exert their effects on wellbeing.

Most recently, she has been focussed on developing and evaluating online (digital) mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) in student and occupational samples for various wellbeing outcomes.

Dawn’s secondary research interests focus on understanding the lived experience of hormonal conditions in women (e.g., Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Endometriosis, Perimenopause, Menopause), and in the development and evaluation of interventions to improve women’s experiences and coping.

She has a keen interest in conducting interdisciplinary research in this area considering the impacts of nutrition, exercise and psychosocial interventions.

PhD supervision         

Dawn welcomes PhD enquiries in the following areas:

  • The impact of work-related stress on mental health
  • Developing and evaluating multilevel interventions for mental health in the workplace and more broadly
  • Developing and evaluating team-based interventions in the workplace (e.g., team-based mindfulness)
  • Developing new questionnaire measures in the field of workplace stress
  • Student mental health and wellbeing
  • The experience of women’s hormonal health (e.g., Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Endometriosis, Menopause)
  • Interdisciplinary research considering the relationship between nutrition, exercise (physical activity) and mental health

Selected contributions to the public understanding of science

Dawn's research on the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions in non-clinical populations has featured in two policy documents:

  • Whitmore et al. (2019). Promising practices for health and wellbeing at work: A review of the evidence landscape. Santa Monica: RAND Corporation (copyrighted by Public Health England)
  • NICE (2019). IAPT Assessment Briefing: Be Mindful for adults with depression. NICE.

Selected peer-reviewed publications

  • Querstret, D., O’Brien, K., Skene, D.J., & Maben, J. (2019). Improving Fatigue Risk Management in Healthcare: A scoping review of sleep-related/fatigue-management interventions for nurses and midwives. International Journal of Nursing Studies (in press).
  • Querstret, D. (2019). Collaborating with students to support mental health and student wellbeing. In S. Lygo-Baker, I. Kinchin, & N. Winstone (Eds.). Engaging Student Voices in Higher Education. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Bakosh, L., Tobias Mortlock, J., Querstret, D., & Morison, L. (2018). Audio-guided mindfulness training in schools and its effect on academic attainment: Contributing to theory and practice. Learning and Instruction. 58, 34-41. doi: 10.1016/j.learninstruc.2018.04.012.
  • Querstret, D., Cropley, M., & Fife-Schaw, C. (2018). The effect of an online mindfulness intervention on perceived stress, depression and anxiety in a non-clinical sample. A randomised waitlist control trial. Mindfulness. 9(6), 1825–1836. doi: 10.1007/s12671-018-0925-0.
  • Cropley, M., Zijlstra, F., Querstret, D., & Beck, S. (2017). Is work-related rumination associated with deficits in executive functioning? Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 1524. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01524.
  • Allan, J., Querstret, D., Banas, K., & de Bruin, M. (2016). Environmental interventions for altering eating behaviours of employees in the workplace: A systematic review. Obesity Reviews, 18(2), 214-226. doi: 10.1111/obr.12470.
  • Querstret, D., Cropley, M., & Fife-Schaw, C. (2016). Internet-based instructor-led mindfulness for work-related rumination, fatigue and sleep: assessing facets of mindfulness as mechanisms of change. A randomised waitlist control trial. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 22(2), 153-169. doi: 10.1037/ocp0000028.
  • Querstret, D., Cropley, M., Kruger, P., & Heron, R. (2015). Assessing the effect of a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT)-based workshop on work-related rumination, fatigue, and sleep. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 25(1), 50-67. doi: 10.1080/1359432X.2015.1015516.
  • Querstret, D., & Cropley, M. (2013). Assessing treatments used to reduce rumination and/or worry: a systematic review. Clinical Psychology Review, 33, 996-1009. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2013.08.004.
  • Querstret, D., & Robinson, O. C. (2013). Person, persona and personality modification: An in-depth qualitative exploration of quantitative findings. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 10, 140-159. doi: 10.1080/14780887.2011.586450.
  • Querstret, D. & Cropley, M. (2012). Exploring the relationship between work-related rumination, sleep quality and work-related fatigue. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 17, 341-353. doi: 10.1037/a0028552.

Conference papers and published abstracts

  • Querstret, D. (2019). Work-related rumination: the impact of repetitively thinking about work in non-work time. Invited speaker at ‘Surviving the NHS’ conference, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK. 6
  • Cropley, M., Zijlstra, F.R.H., Querstret, D., Beck, S. (2017). Is Work-related Rumination Associated with deficits in Executive Functioning? Congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology, Dublin, Ireland. 17-20 May.
  • Querstret, D., Cropley, M., & Fife-Schaw, C. (2016). Assessing the effect of a 4-week online mindfulness course on perceived stress, depression and anxiety: A randomised waitlist control trial. Paper presented at the International Congress of Behavioural Medicine (ICBM) conference, Melbourne, Australia. 7-10 Dec.
  • Querstret, D., Cropley, M., & Fife-Schaw, C. (2015). Web-based mindfulness for work-related rumination, fatigue and sleep: assessing mechanisms of change. A randomised waitlist control trial. Paper presented at the 11th International Conference on Occupational Stress and Health: Work, Stress and Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. 6-9 May.
  • Querstret, D., & Cropley, M. (2014). Assessing the efficacy of a 4-week Internet-based mindfulness intervention to reduce work-related rumination and fatigue: A waitlist control study. Paper presented at the 11th European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology conference, London, UK. 14-16 Apr.
  • Querstret, D., & Cropley, M. (2013). Assessing the efficacy of a work-place CBT intervention to reduce work-related rumination and fatigue: a quasi-experimental longitudinal study. Paper presented at Recovery and Restoration: The Interface between the Individual and the Environment. International workshop at Lillehammer University College (HiL), Hamar, Norway. 10-12 Jun.
  • Querstret, D., & Cropley, M. (2013). A longitudinal study examining work-related rumination as a predictor of change in work-related fatigue over time. Paper presented at the 16th congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology, Meunster, Germany. 22-25 May.
  • Querstret, D., & Cropley, M. (2013). Inauthenticity at work, dispositional authenticity, and personality traits as predictors of work-related rumination: a cross-sectional study. Poster presented at the 16th congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology, Meunster, Germany. 22-25 May.
  • Querstret, D., & Cropley, M. (2012). Investigating the relationship between work-related rumination, sleep quality and work-related fatigue. Paper presented at the 10th European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology conference, Zurich, Switzerland. 11-13 Apr.
  • Querstret, D., Robinson, O. C. (2010). ‘Putting on an act? Exploring motivations for, and experiences of, high cross-context personality variability in young adults’. Paper presented at the British Psychological Society national conference, Stratford-upon-Avon, England. 14-16 Apr.

Media enquiries

For media enquiries, please contact our Communications and Public Engagement Manager, Sam Yarnold, by emailling sam.yarnold@stmarys.ac.uk or calling 020 8240 8262.